Spiced Fresh Orange and Honey Sorbet

This recipe has been featured in a post on The Recipe Girl blog: Greek Dinner Party- The Desserts!

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Spiced Fresh Orange & Honey Sorbet

Yield: 4 cups

Prep Time: 40 min + chilling time

Cook Time: 20 min

We made this one to go with the desserts for our Greek dinner party. Everyone enjoyed the interesting flavors. I used star of anise, cloves, a dried bay leaf and grated ginger. So good!

Ingredients:

3 cups water
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup clover honey
2 Tablespoons finely grated orange peel
1 Tablespoon chopped peeled fresh ginger
2 whole star anise or cardamom pods
2 whole cloves
1 small bay leaf, preferably fresh
2 cups chilled fresh orange juice
3 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Directions:

1. Combine first 8 ingredients in heavy large saucepan. Bring to boil over medium-high heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Boil until syrup is thick and mixture is reduced to 2 cups, about 12 minutes. Discard bay leaf; cool syrup.

2. Strain syrup through fine sieve into medium bowl. Add orange juice and lemon juice. Pour into a bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight.

3. Transfer to ice cream maker and process according to manufacturer's instructions. Transfer sorbet to container, cover, and freeze until firm, at least 6 hours and up to 3 days.

Tips:

*I used Trader Joe's fresh orange juice and it worked just fine.
*The sorbet will process better if the mixture is quite chilled before putting into your ice cream maker.

Source: RecipeGirl.com (via Bon Appetit)

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4 Responses to “Spiced Fresh Orange and Honey Sorbet”

  1. 1

    Richard — June 13, 2010 @ 3:33 PM

    I have to make spiced fresh orange and honey sorbet and I cannot get fresh star anise. Is this the fruit or is it dry? I have anise seed . Is this the same?

  2. 2

    Lori Lange — June 14, 2010 @ 7:33 AM

    @Richard, Star anise is a little dried spice in the shape of a star. I find it at a middle eastern market, but you can also find it at well stocked supermarkets in the spice aisle. I don’t think anise seed is the same.

  3. 3

    Tara Douglas — August 6, 2014 @ 4:24 PM

    Boiling did not really turn my pot into syrup… Did I do something wrong?

  4. 4

    Lori Lange — August 12, 2014 @ 4:08 PM

    Boiling for a bit reduces the liquid and makes it syrupy.