Watermelon Sorbet

Here’s an easy Watermelon Sorbet recipe that is perfect for using up fresh, seedless watermelon.

Scoops of Watermelon Sorbet

It’s been a pretty hot summer.  And it’s been one of those summers where a lot of frozen treats have been prepared and consumed in my house.  This Watermelon Sorbet has been one of them.  When the temperature hovers over 100 degrees the entire summer (hello, Arizona!), these kinds of frozen treats are hugely necessary.

What I love about Watermelon Sorbet is that it’s sweet and refreshing.  Sure, it has plenty of sugar in it.  But it isn’t laden heavy with cream.  It just feels like a cold, welcome treat on a hot day.

Scoops of Watermelon Sorbet in a martini glass

How to Pick a Good Watermelon:

Choosing a good watermelon that is ripe and juicy is something that I just learned how to do this summer.  When you’re at the store, pick up the watermelon you want to buy.  It should feel heavy for its size.

You should also be looking for a decent yellow spot on the watermelon.  I used to look for a perfect looking watermelon with no spots, but I’ve learned that perfect looking watermelons are not yet ripe.  A ripe watermelon has a yellow spot– which indicates that it has been resting on that spot for a sufficient amount of time to achieve ripeness.

Lastly, give your watermelon a thump with your hand.  If it sounds hollow when thumped, that’s a ripe watermelon that will be juicy inside.  If you thump it and the sound is dull-ish, the watermelon is likely over or under ripe.

Scoops of Watermelon Sorbet

How to Make Watermelon Sorbet:

Making any kind of sorbet is a pretty easy process as it usually involves sugar, water and fruit.  This recipe calls for those things, plus some added port wine (can sub white grape juice) for a better depth of flavor.

First, a sugar/water syrup is made.  The watermelon is processed and then strained to get rid of the pulp.  The sugar syrup, watermelon juice, port wine and lemon juice are combined to make the sorbet base.  An ice cream maker does the work to turn it into sorbet.

Scoops of Watermelon Sorbet in a martini glass, garnished with fresh mint

Watermelon Sorbet is the perfect summer dessert!

If you’re looking for more sorbet recipes, you might also enjoy my Easy Strawberry Sorbet or this Spiced Fresh Orange & Honey SorbetChocolate Sorbet, Blueberry Sorbet and Pomegranate & Blood Orange Sorbet are good sorbet choices too!

Watermelon Sorbet

A completely refreshing frozen treat starring fresh watermelon!

Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword sorbet, watermelon
Prep Time 15 minutes
Chill Time 4 hours
Servings 16 servings (1/2 cup per serving)
Calories 95 kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups granulated white sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 6 cups cubed seedless watermelon (no rind)
  • 1/2 cup tawny port wine or white grape juice
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Bring the sugar and water to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally until the sugar dissolves. Reduce the heat, and simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and cool.

  2. Process the watermelon in food processor until smooth. Pour the watermelon puree through a fine wire-mesh strainer into a bowl, discarding the pulp.

  3. Combine the sugar syrup, watermelon juice, wine or grape juice, and lemon juice in a covered container. Let chill at least 4 hours, or overnight. Pour into the container of 1 gallon electric ice cream processor; process according to manufacturer's instructions. Serve immediately, or place into an airtight container and store in the freezer.

Recipe Notes

  • 5 WEIGHT WATCHERS FREESTYLE SMARTPOINTS PER 1/2 CUP
Nutrition Facts
Watermelon Sorbet
Amount Per Serving (1 serving (1/2 cup))
Calories 95
% Daily Value*
Sodium 2mg 0%
Potassium 75mg 2%
Total Carbohydrates 24g 8%
Sugars 23g
Vitamin A 6.5%
Vitamin C 7.4%
Calcium 0.6%
Iron 0.9%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

This post was originally shared in 2008.  It was edited and re-published in 2018.

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